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North Carolina- Behind a 3rd World Country

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    Posted: 18 November 2020 at 2:13pm

Banning Gillnets just makes Dollars and Sense!

What doesn't NC get?

Belize is considered a 3rd World Country or at best a developing country.

What did Belize just do?

(Note: my highlights in Red below for emphasis)



BELIZE CITY, Mon. Nov. 9, 2020– Oceana, the global organization that helped Belizeans defend our barrier reef from oil exploration, scored again this week when, after over a decade of efforts by the organization to push for a ban on gill net use in our waters, a statutory instrument (SI) was signed to end the practice. SI No. 158 of 2020, which establishes the ban, was signed into law by caretaker Minister of Fisheries, Forestry, the Environment and Sustainable Development (MFFESD), Dr. Hon. Omar Figueroa, on November 5, 2020.

A joint release from the MFFESD and the Coalition for Sustainable Fisheries and Oceana, says the SI prohibiting the use and possession of gill nets in our maritime waters comes after a two-year long process that involved a successful transition programme for fisherfolk who depended on this type of fishing for their livelihoods.

In 2018 a stakeholder taskforce was set up to examine gill net use with the aim to develop recommendations in 2019 to phase out the fishing method, which would then culminate with a ban on the practice. In 2020 an agreement was signed “between the Coalition for Sustainable Fisheries, Oceana and the Government of Belize to assist gill net fishers to transition to alternative income generating opportunities and trade-in their gill nets.” Fisherfolk who bucked the proposed ban in the first instance, agreed after they were successfully engaged in 2020 in the buy-back process that is helping them transition to other forms of fishing, and/or livelihoods.

On the signing of the SI banning the use of gillnets, the Coalition commented that the measures “will ensure that productive fisheries remain available for future generations of fishers”. The Vice-President of Oceana in Belize, Ms. Janelle Chanona, said the ban “is a win for all Belizeans”, and NGO Senator, Hon. Osmany Salas, said the ban will “benefit current and future generations of Belizeans.”

One of the big problems with gillnets is that they kill many fish species that are not consumed, and they also ensnare bone fish, tarpon, and permits, three highly prized protected species that are the backbone of the fly fishing industry. It is expected that many of the highly skilled fisherfolk who used gill nets will transition to the tourist industry, when they are not engaged in legal fishing – trapping lobster, diving conch, and hand-line fishing.
The ban on gill nets will result in a major increase in the populations of the species prized by sports fishermen, so those engaged in the business will earn more.

Mr. Vincent Gillett, a former senior Fisheries officer for the Government of Belize, and former CEO of the Coastal Zone Management Authority and Institute, in a paper titled, “Case Study: Belize Fisheries and Tourism Markets — exploring linkages to enhance development, competitiveness and greater local participation”, reported that “Sport fishing was the first activity to attract the ‘specialty’ tourist to Belize (Huesner, 1996)”, and that “after five decades of developing the fishery, Belize is now one of the few countries in the world where fishing enthusiasts can perform the ‘Grand Slam’ – catching a Permit (Tachinotus falcatus), a Tarpon (Megalops atlanticus) and a Bonefish (Albula spp.) in one day.”

Gillett reported that in 2007 Belize generated US$28 million in gross revenue from sports fishing, of which US$15 million was paid out in annual salaries and wages. In 2008 sports fishing employed 1,864 persons, 100 of them independent fishing guides. In 2020 the 200 or so fisherfolk who used gill nets will turn them into goal nets, and many, most likely, will be obtaining licenses so that they can take tourists out sports fishing.




Edited by Rick - 18 November 2020 at 2:13pm
fiogf49gjkf0d
NC Fisheries Management- Motto: Too Little, Too Late, Too Bad   Slogan: Shrimp On! Mission Statement: Enable Commercial Fishing At Any and All Cost, Regardless of Impact to the Resource.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 November 2020 at 2:16pm

Statutory Instrument Signed into Law to Ban Gill Nets from Marine Waters

JOINT PRESS RELEASE

Ministry of Fisheries, Forestry, the Environment and Sustainable Development (MFFESD), the Coalition for Sustainable Fisheries and Oceana

Belmopan, (6th November 2020).  In a demonstration of commitment to maintain a vibrant and sustainable fishery sector, Dr. Hon. Omar Figueroa, Minister of Fisheries, Forestry, the Environment and Sustainable Development, has signed into law Statutory Instrument No. 158 of 2020 titled Fisheries Resources (Gill net prohibition) Regulations, 2020, banning the use and possession of gill nets in the marine waters of Belize.  The area covered by the ban includes all the sea under the jurisdiction of Belize.

The passage of Statutory Instrument 158 of 2020 concludes a two-year long process which began in 2018 that saw: (i) the establishment of a stakeholder taskforce in 2018 to examine the issue of gill net use; (ii) the development of recommendations in 2019 to phase out gill nets concluding in a ban; (iii) the signing of a cooperate agreement in 2020 between the Coalition for Sustainable Fisheries, Oceana and the Government of Belize to assist gill net fishers to transition to alternative income generating opportunities and trade-in their gill nets; and (iv) the successful engagement of gill net fishers in 2020 in the transition and buy-back process.  At the culmination of this two-year long process, with a successful transition programme in place, the use and possession of gill nets in the maritime waters is now prohibited by the gazetting of Statutory Instrument 158 of 2020 on 5th November 2020.

On the occasion of the signing, the Coalition stated, “The Coalition thanks those Belizean gill net fishers who have voluntarily surrendered their gill nets, thereby providing all Belizean fishers with a brighter future. These measures will ensure that productive fisheries remain available for future generations of fishers and will provide security to all those whose livelihoods depend on a healthy marine ecosystem. These include tour guides, restaurant and hotel owners, fly fishing guides and a host of others, all of whom dedicate much time and energy toward safeguarding our natural heritage. The Coalition looks forward to continuing its work with the former gill nets fishers by providing them financial and other resources which will help them to adopt alternative fishing practices.”

Commenting on this milestone, Janelle Chanona, Vice President of Oceana, stated, “The ban on gill nets is a win for all Belizeans. We recognize the sensational voices of all fishers, activists and allies who have ensured that this issue has remained a priority.  Oceana reiterates its unwavering commitment to supporting the policies and practices that increase abundance so that fishers can always depend on fishing and so Belize can always boast magnificent marine biodiversity.”

Hon. Osmany Salas, NGO Senator, offered his congratulations and support. He said, “The ban on gill nets demonstrates the serious collective commitment by the Government, NGO community and the public about improving the sustainable management of our fishery resources for the benefit of current and future generations of Belizeans. I offer my congratulations to everyone who worked hard to make the ban a reality.”

The Government of Belize recognizes the collective commitment of the private sector, conservation community and fishers to the sustainability of our fisheries sector and will continue to work to ensure that Belizeans will be able to depend on a bountiful and beautiful Caribbean Sea for generations to come.



Edited by Rick - 18 November 2020 at 2:27pm
fiogf49gjkf0d
NC Fisheries Management- Motto: Too Little, Too Late, Too Bad   Slogan: Shrimp On! Mission Statement: Enable Commercial Fishing At Any and All Cost, Regardless of Impact to the Resource.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TomM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 November 2020 at 10:21pm
Making sense seems to elude so many
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