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Another "Fine" Example of a NC Gillnet Operation

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    Posted: 14 October 2020 at 1:21pm
Here's a good example of the smoke and mirrors game the Division plays- deflections with half-truths and clear omissions of fact. There is no defense.

This is a response from the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries when recently asked about gill nets.

 The N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries takes protection of sea turtles very seriously and has undertaken education efforts over the years to teach commercial and recreational fishermen ways to minimize interactions. Gill net fishing is one of many human activities along the coast that can interact with and harm sea turtles. Other activities that can harm sea turtles include dredging for boat channels, beach nourishment, driving on the beach, other types of commercial and recreational fishing, littering, and boating.

The division has also implemented numerous management measures that reduce sea turtle interactions and unwanted fish bycatch in commercial fishing gear.

Regulations specific to gill nets include attendance requirements (fishermen are required to remain close to their nets); time of day restrictions; area and season closures; minimum mesh size requirements; setback requirements; identification marking requirements, and yardage restrictions.

Most recently, regulations were implemented for the small mesh gill net fishery restricting yardage, requiring attendance and closing areas to stationary nets.

The division has been reviewing Marine Fisheries Commission rules pertaining to small mesh gill nets and plans to present options for rule changes to the commission in November.

Additionally, North Carolina’s estuarine gill net fishery is managed under incidental take permits for sea turtles and Atlantic sturgeon, issued to the state by the National Marine Fisheries Service. The permits outline conservation plans to limit takes of these species, listed under the federal Endangered Species Act, to authorized levels.

A condition of the incidental take permits requires the state to maintain certain levels of observer coverage – division staff either go out on the boats with fishermen or observe from gill net fishing from division boats. The majority of sea turtles and Atlantic sturgeon observed are released alive and unharmed. If the number of observed interactions with these species approaches the number of allowed interactions, the division can close certain areas to gill net fishing.

Also, as a condition of the incidental take permits, the division requires fishermen to obtain an Estuarine Gill Net Permit to use any anchored small or large mesh gill net in internal coastal waters. This provides a list of fishery participants that staff can use to contact fishermen for observer trips. As of Aug. 31, 2020, 1,956 fishermen had the permit.

Fisheries management can be complicated, and gill net management is no exception. They can vary within the state by, by region, by time of year, and by many other factors. Some of the variation in these regulations, such as seasonal closures and gear modification requirements, are meant to reduce regulatory discards. However, stock assessments do account for live and dead discarded fish in commercial and recreational gear. This information is figured into fisheries management decisions.

Although gill net regulations vary from state to state, North Carolina is by no means the only state that allows gill nets fishing. Of the 15 states on the East Coast, only Florida and Pennsylvania ban gill nets outright.

Division of Marine Fisheries/Division of Coastal Management


https://foxwilmington.com/local-news...l8ZH9YX3r6GpAg


Edited by Rick - 14 October 2020 at 1:51pm
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NC Fisheries Management- Motto: Too Little, Too Late, Too Bad   Slogan: Shrimp On! Mission Statement: Enable Commercial Fishing At Any and All Cost, Regardless of Impact to the Resource.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 October 2020 at 8:11pm
Many of you will remember this photo also from the Newport River-



Edited by Rick - 12 October 2020 at 8:12pm
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NC Fisheries Management- Motto: Too Little, Too Late, Too Bad   Slogan: Shrimp On! Mission Statement: Enable Commercial Fishing At Any and All Cost, Regardless of Impact to the Resource.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 October 2020 at 5:57pm

Newport River-


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NC Fisheries Management- Motto: Too Little, Too Late, Too Bad   Slogan: Shrimp On! Mission Statement: Enable Commercial Fishing At Any and All Cost, Regardless of Impact to the Resource.
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