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Derelict Fishing Vessels

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    Posted: 30 September 2019 at 1:01pm


Why should the NC taxpayer fund removal of derelict fishing vessels!

Hey...I know where the state can get a $1-million from the guys causing a large part of the problem...and if that's not enough, the state can raise the cost of all commercial fishing licenses to pay for the clean-up of derelict commercial fishing vessels.


Let's do something positive with the excess funds in the CFRF programs instead of letting the NCFA use the that "slush fund" to study the "value of the commercial fishing industry" and run a "public relations campaign". 




RALEIGH – A recent report from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission recommends putting a state agency in charge of removing derelict and abandoned vessels in navigable North Carolina waters, with dedicated funding to address the problem.

Abandoned vessels on the Rachel Carson Reserve. Photo: Rachel Carson Reserve

In North Carolina, the legislature has granted limited authority to local governments and state agencies to determine how and when a vessel can be removed. But local officials continue to struggle with abandoned and derelict vessels in waterways and sometimes washed up on public or private lands, threatening navigation and the environment.

The North Carolina General Assembly in 2018 directed the WRC to provide the report by April 30 because of the growing concerns over abandoned vessels and to consult the Division of Coastal Management, North Carolina Coastal Federation, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Marine Debris program, marine salvage industry experts, commercial and recreational boat owners and other stakeholders.

“The report detailed many different approaches used by other states in the management of abandoned and derelict vessels. It also described some of the challenges other states face in the management of abandoned and derelict vessels based on their management practices and laws in their state,” Ryan Kennemur, public affairs specialist with the state Wildlife Resources Commission, told Coastal Review Online.

The report notes that the resource used as a starting point was current up to 2015 and the researchers reached out to each coastal and Great Lakes state included in the report to update, clarify and collect more data.

Ryan Kennemur

In addition to naming a lead state agency to manage the problem, the report also recommends establishing a WRC-coordinated task force for abandoned and derelict vessels, or ADVs, as well as enacting a law defining and addressing ADVs statewide with disposal options and vessel owner notification protocols and rights. The report also calls for establishing education, outreach and prevention programs, including a vessel turn-in program fashioned after those used by other states.

The WRC manages more than 200 boating access areas on public waters across the state and is the chief enforcer of boating safety laws in North Carolina. In addition, the WRC works with local governments to determine no-wake zones.

“The WRC also manages the placement of waterway markers in conformance with the uniform rules to aids to navigation for boating access areas and approved no-wake zones across the state,” Kennemur said.

The University of North Carolina Institute for the Environment and the North Carolina Policy Collaboratory were contracted to research how other states with navigable waterways manage abandoned and derelict vessels for the report.

Researcher Susan Cohen with the Institute for the Environment said that the WRC developed the report’s overall approach to address and meet the North Carolina legislative direction.

Susan Cohen

She explained that the Institute of the Environment provided a summary of abandoned and derelict vessel programs in coastal and Great Lakes states produced by using sources of existing, current information, including the NOAA Marine Debris Program, with follow-up communications with each of the states to confirm that information. “Other groups, like NOAA for example, have done a great job capturing state-level information and we just built off what these other efforts had accomplished,” she said.

According to the report submitted to WRC, An Overview of State Abandoned and Derelict Vessel Programs, no single federal law is in place to comprehensively address ADVs, especially if navigation hazards or pollutants are not an issue.

Depending on circumstances such as pollution and navigation threats, there are laws and regulations that give authority to certain federal agencies, including NOAA, which is the lead agency on ADVs, the Army Corps of Engineers, the Coast Guard, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, but for the most part, the responsibility ultimately falls on state and local authorities to manage the derelict and abandoned vessel.

“Our primary concentrations within the (report) summary were the status of legislation within each state, where decision-making authority to respond to ADVs lies, the resources expended by each state and the numbers of boats removed. This snapshot provides decision makers with a view of the broad range of strategies used by other states without being prescriptive to how North Carolina should respond,” Cohen added.

The report used NOAA’s “ADV InfoHub,” a website describing how ADVs are handled by each coastal state, as a starting point, compiling existing information on state programs and fact sheets for each state, current through 2015. The report acknowledged that since then, several states have enacted legislation and provided funding to support ADV programs.

The researchers sent a questionnaire by email March 8 with a follow-up March 15 to more than two dozen coastal and Great Lakes states, except North Carolina, to fill in gaps, update and gather information related to legislation, funding and measurable results from ADV programs. Of the 28 states that were contacted, 14 responded.

Results of the questionnaire show that other states typically do not keep detailed records on removed ADVs or funding. Many of those responding to the questionnaire were unable to give numbers on funding or removal efforts.

Shown are states with and without formal processes that outline how a vessel can be removed from the water and, states with and without an ADV program. Map: Wildlife Resources Commission

States that reported the greatest numbers of ADVs between 2013 and 2016 were Ohio, which has no allocated funding,  at 1,400; Texas at 1,080; Florida at 824; California at 657; and Washington, which has a $2.5 million program that has removed more than 700 vessels since 2002, at 366.

Kennemur with WRC said North Carolina does not track the number of ADVs found each year.

The results point to a handful of issues that interfere with managing ADVs in waterways, including the challenge of finding vessel owners, the lack of recurring state funding in 20 of the 30 coastal and Great Lakes states and a lack of understanding as to what authorities are responsible for certain actions and preventive measures.

The report notes that of the 30 coastal and Great Lakes states, 29 had some type of legislation addressing ADVs, with 16 of those states having enacted legislation during the last 10 years. New York is the only state that hadn’t enacted ADV laws.

Also, of those 30 states, 21 have laws that include civil penalties for abandoning or failing to remove a vessel after notice. Twelve states impose criminal penalties for abandoning or failing to remove a vessel after being notified.

Six states have adopted a vessel turn-in program in an effort to prevent vessels that are older or in poor condition from entering the water and becoming an ADV. Although details vary by state, the program allows owners or marinas to turn over vessels to a state or agency for proper disposal at no cost.




Edited by Rick - 30 September 2019 at 1:27pm
fiogf49gjkf0d
NC Fisheries Management- Motto: Too Little, Too Late, Too Bad   Slogan: Shrimp On! Mission Statement: Enable Commercial Fishing At Any and All Cost, Regardless of Impact to the Resource.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chriselk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 September 2019 at 6:25pm
Rick,
We hear repeated complaints about bad water quality from the commercial sector, blaming it on upstream sources.  I have never heard them speak of bad water quality from sunken fishing vessels.  There have been repeated oil spills in Marshallberg Harbor from shrimpers and other boats.  In fact one shrimper is still sitting on the bottom since Florence, spilling her guts.  

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Tbykr22DLXRt-cujKejXQEQZ1ngVCGCW    

I expect this is not an isolated event.  Do others have any other info?  Should we create a webpage for derelict vessels to document the problem?  I bet legislators would be interested, especially if a readily available source of funds could start the process.

I am told that DEQ prides itself on protecting our water and air.  In fact, I know that DEQ is already aware of the problem, but I am not aware of any action yet.

This should be viewed as an opportunity to clean up our waters. We don.t need petroleum products of any form, liquid or solid, polluting our waters.


Edited by chriselk - 30 September 2019 at 6:55pm
The above comments are my personal opinion and do not represent those of any organizations or agencies I may be a member of.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chasintrout Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 September 2019 at 8:35pm
The owners of the land where the sunken trawler was abandoned and sunk in marshallberg harbor have received a grant from the state to have it removed. Tell me that’s not a waste of taxpayers money!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 October 2019 at 8:26am

Below is a good example of a "serial" polluter of our public trust waters.  

Why in the world does the state not require these businesses to carry insurance that will cover the cost of removing a vessel once declared derelict?  An increase in the SCFL/RSCFL/SFVR fees could be used to cover the ones that slip by without insurance.

Taylor had the Lady Barbara sink in Oriental Harbor in 2013 dumping fuel and oil into the harbor and Green and Smith Creeks.  Taylor raised the boat that February and moved it to Marshallberg Harbor (one of the free state owned "hurricane harbors") where it has been sitting on the bottom with an oil boom around ever since. 









Taylor's sister ship to the Lady Barbara, the Miss Melissa, sank in Core Creek last August where it dumped fuel and oil for six months.  The coast guard has classified the boat as presenting no navigation hazard, so it has become a derelict vessel.



 




Edited by Rick - 01 October 2019 at 9:00am
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NC Fisheries Management- Motto: Too Little, Too Late, Too Bad   Slogan: Shrimp On! Mission Statement: Enable Commercial Fishing At Any and All Cost, Regardless of Impact to the Resource.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kshivar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 October 2019 at 9:24am
Double standard. Once while fueling at Island Harbor Marina a fellow spilled maybe 10 gallons and the CG showed up as well as DEQ employee and they basically threw a duck fit, put out a containment boom and tried to capture the fuel. So commercials get a pass on this too. Aren’t they the ones who blame water quality as one of the reasons we don’t have spots, croakers, et. al. They don’t even believe their lies.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote todobien Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 October 2019 at 4:38pm
Can't remembe which beach in brunswick but there had been a trawler or two on bottom for years there. Others along AIWW section of Core Creek over the years. Barge and excavator sitting on bottom in Neuse just outside South River for several months now
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote marker39 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 October 2019 at 6:53pm
Holden Beach

Around here it is sailboats.

They will be scattered everywhere after every hurricane.

BW #2
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TomM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 October 2019 at 7:00pm
They should have numbers registration. Last owner of record should be responsible for removal and mitigated cost.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chriselk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 October 2019 at 7:47pm
Yes, we have our share of sailboats here too.

But the fuel issue is not present.

They are a lot smaller generally and should be able to be pulled out of the marsh with a Tow  Boat US vessel.  Let me get up with them for their expertise.


The above comments are my personal opinion and do not represent those of any organizations or agencies I may be a member of.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote todobien Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 October 2019 at 8:59pm
Barge has spuds and to of excavator stocking up but no reflective marking my understan ding is no removal of fuel hydraulic fuidetc
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote marker39 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 October 2019 at 7:38am
I understand about the fuel.

I was just speaking of derelict boats and the lack of owner responsibility.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 October 2019 at 8:44am
Originally posted by marker39 marker39 wrote:

I understand about the fuel.

I was just speaking of derelict boats and the lack of owner responsibility.

 

It would be nice if it was that simple, but it's not on the commercial side.  Take the Miss Melissa for example.  Taylor has it set up in an LLC.  Family interceded with the claim that he is mentally incapable and the LLC is insolvent when the USACE went to Taylor about his legal responsibilities.  ACE will not pursue it any further.   Had it been a threat to ICW traffic, or if it becomes one, then the ACE will have the USCG remove it.  Other than that, it sits on the bottom and rots.   





Edited by Rick - 02 October 2019 at 8:44am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 October 2019 at 9:02am
Originally posted by chasintrout chasintrout wrote:

The owners of the land where the sunken trawler was abandoned and sunk in marshallberg harbor have received a grant from the state to have it removed. Tell me that’s not a waste of taxpayers money!
 

NC taxpayers creating benefit for out-of-state corporations from our public resources...kind of reminds me of the shrimp trawling industry.

The "owners of the land" as of August 9th, 2019 are two Marionville, Virginia based corporations-

Bowen Clam Company, Inc

and

Broadwater Seafood, LLC




Edited by Rick - 02 October 2019 at 9:04am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 October 2019 at 5:02pm
  


...and from a very reliable source...Mr. Taylor received over $35,000 from Gov. Cooper's "Florence Relief Fund"-








Edited by Rick - 03 October 2019 at 6:00pm
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