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Third District Candidates views on fishery issues

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    Posted: 17 April 2019 at 3:39pm
FisheryNation.com has posted a link to NCFA's questioning of the third district candidates, and their responses, on coastal/fisheries issues.


The eight questions  submitted to the candidates for Walter B. Jones' seat are:

1.) Although inlets are located in state waters, the marking of those inlets for navigational purposes is done by the Coast Guard, and the maintenance by the Corps of Engineers through dredging. Are you aware of the issues of dredging and the importance of funding to assure that inlets can provide safe passage for recreational and commercial fishermen and charter and head boat operations?

2.) One issue that is shared by state and federal fisheries management is that of game fish designation. Do you know what happens when a fish species is declared a game fish? What do you think about it?

3.) What do you think about banning commercial gear, such as nets or trawls?

4.) Do you have a position on offshore drilling for oil and/or natural gas? What about seismic testing?

5.) What do you think of wind farms in the ocean off our coast?

6.) Most everyone understands that we live in a globally economy and seafood is certainly no exception. The question has always been, do we have fair trade? We compete with many countries that have fisheries for competing products but without the same regard for the environment as we do. In addition, some countries “dump” their products into the United States resulting in unfair competition. Can you address these issues?

7.) Seafood is a perishable product and so once brought to the dock, processing is critical. In that regard, finding labor has been an ongoing problem with our seafood packers and processors. For years, many seafood businesses have relied on the H-2B program through the US Department of Labor to hire non-immigrants to do temporary work. What is your opinion of this program?

8.) Finally, what is your opinion about the importance of commercial fishing in eastern North Carolina in general and specifically the Third Congressional District?  

Fifteen candidates have responded with answers on this link. 

Looks like I'll be changing my vote.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kshivar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 April 2019 at 5:49pm
“Globally economy”? I wonder what moron wrote that?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kshivar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 April 2019 at 7:53pm
Speciale is a special kind of stupid or simply an enemy of the resource.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cnaff Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 April 2019 at 8:23am
Shannon Bray gave the only pro resource answers. I didn't see any serious contemplation of the economic effects of the state fostering depleted fisheries' decline, in any response. The idea that free trade is synonymous with unfettered access for the commercial industry, without demonstrating knowledge of depletion of resources in state waters is appalling. Are we watching a bunch of galoots reciting their similarly scripted paeon to the continued degradation of the estuary without remorse because they see no one suffering from the mismanagement, or do we simply see this would-be mulctitude of mostly dousche bags (save for Shannon Bray) echoing the good ol' different wishes of the coastal voter? Does the third hold any populations of people who give a crap about the resource? Could this piece be fodder for the resource friendly to use to clobber any of these duffuses in the political run up to the election? Don't forget the resource dunce who vacated the position in question by politely croaking out, in his glad handing of $800,000 to that guy who was just lying. Do we think there's any hope the imbeciles who run this whore-state will ever get the clue we have problems in the estuary that will require an understanding of how the economy once worked, and could work again, instead of the evident orthodoxy infecting their minuscule world view that it's all a zero sum game depending on the kamikaze ncfa view of how to prosecute a fishery?
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Cnaff, same thing I was thinking was Shannon Bray gave the only pro resource answers. Unless I see someone that is more for the resource, guess I'll be casting my vote toward Shannon.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chriselk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 April 2019 at 1:26pm
 This is pathognomonic of the knowledge of most legislators.  At best they are poorly informed, at worst misinformed.  They are bombarded with cries about putting fishermen out of business, but not about fishermen putting themselves out of business when the resource crashes.

It is our job to call our legislators and put them on the right path.  Most of the time we should attempt to drive the science-based argument.  Obviously, that science should include biologic, and importantly the economic importance of recreational fishing, which dwarfs that of commercial fishing.

When recreational fishermen throw in the towel, this is what happens:

Anybody wanna guess how many tens or hundreds of millions were lost last year?


Edited by chriselk - 18 April 2019 at 1:27pm
The above comments are my personal opinion and do not represent those of any organizations or agencies I may be a member of.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 April 2019 at 2:23pm
Originally posted by chriselk chriselk wrote:

 This is pathognomonic of the knowledge of most legislators.  At best they are poorly informed, at worst misinformed.  They are bombarded with cries about putting fishermen out of business, but not about fishermen putting themselves out of business when the resource crashes.

It is our job to call our legislators and put them on the right path.  Most of the time we should attempt to drive the science-based argument.  Obviously, that science should include biologic, and importantly the economic importance of recreational fishing, which dwarfs that of commercial fishing.

When recreational fishermen throw in the towel, this is what happens:

Anybody wanna guess how many tens or hundreds of millions were lost last year?
 




Drum Roll...and where is the Governor's announcement for helping the recreational sector?

We know what he did for the commercial sector...

First Hurricane Assistance Checks Go to Fishermen, Gov. Cooper Announces $11.6 Million Fund to Help Commercial Fishing Industry Recover from Hurricane Florence

Raleigh

North Carolina commercial fishermen hit hard by Hurricane Florence will soon get relief as part of $11.6 million being distributed by the state Division of Marine Fisheries, Governor Roy Cooper announced today.

The N.C. Department of Environmental Quality’s Division of Marine Fisheries in Morehead City today mailed the first round of checks out under the Hurricane Florence Commercial Fishing Assistance Program. The program is designed to help make up for losses to the state’s nearly billion-dollar commercial fishing industry due to the storm. 

“Hurricane Florence dealt a serious blow to North Carolina’s fishing industry last fall, disrupting fishing and destroying boats and gear for fishermen all along our coast,” Gov. Cooper said. “Getting these funds directly into the hands of commercial fisherman will be a big help as they and their families and communities work to recover.”

Today, the state cut 644 checks totaling $3,216,700 to help compensate commercial fishermen for income losses from September harvest reductions due to Hurricane Florence as documented by state harvest records. The state collects records of all marine fish and shellfish sold at North Carolina docks.

A handful of checks for September losses are still being processed due to missing information. These checks will be mailed as soon as possible.

The $11.6 million program is part of a package of Hurricane Florence relief efforts Governor Cooper signed into law on December 3, 2018. 

Distribution of the money is based on reported commercial fishing landings in September, October, and November 2018 as compared to the same months in 2015, 2016, 2017.

 
In December, the Division of Marine Fisheries sent certified letters to approximately 1,800 commercial fishermen to inform them that they were eligible for assistance and to invite them to participate in the program. About 850 commercial fishermen chose to participate. Those with estimated losses based on landings will receive a check.

In the coming weeks, the division will send certified letters to fishermen eligible to participate in the Hurricane Florence Commercial Fishing Assistance Program based on October and November landings. 

The letters will be sent to fishermen who are residents of North Carolina and who held a valid, current Standard or Retired Standard Commercial Fishing License or a Shellfish License for N.C. Residents without a Standard Commercial Fishing License, and who suffered losses in fishing income during October and November 2018, as documented by state records.

Hurricane Florence severely disrupted North Carolina’s commercial fishing industry throughout the fall of 2018. The storm’s historic rainfall and powerful winds destroyed boats, gear and buildings critical to fishing businesses.
As a result of the storm, Gov. Cooper sought and also won a federal disaster declaration for the state’s marine fishing industry. That designation can assist with additional relief for commercial fishing families struggling to make a living while repairing their businesses.

As a result of the storm, Gov. Cooper sought and also won a federal disaster declaration for the state’s marine fishing industry. That designation can assist with additional relief for commercial fishing families struggling to make a living while repairing their businesses.

According to the state Division of Marine Fisheries, the North Carolina commercial fishing industry generated more than $96 million in revenue in 2017. 




Edited by Rick - 18 April 2019 at 2:28pm
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NC Fisheries Management- Motto: Too Little, Too Late, Too Bad   Slogan: Shrimp On! Mission Statement: Enable Commercial Fishing At Any and All Cost, Regardless of Impact to the Resource.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bakesta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 April 2019 at 2:27pm
Chris

That looks like ALL trips (fresh and salt).  Is the down turn thought to be based on salt water trips?

Are those data from DMF?


Anecdotally, I saw nothing but empty ramps last fall on the western pamlico.  There was no reason to put in much effort unless you just wanted to ride around.


If anybody doesn't believe the fishing has gotten worse, that graph could be the true indicator of stock status.





"Do the right thing. It will gratify some people and astonish the rest." --- Mark Twain
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chriselk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 April 2019 at 3:44pm
Those are saltwater trips, data generated from NOAA.  The data are grouped into "waves", or every  two months, a common fisheries grouping to describe/follow effort and harvest.

Note that the drop in effort came before the hurricane.  That drop began in May and carried thru the entire year.  The last two years folks have not gone fishing at the coast during the normal peak vacation periods of July and August.  That is a huge impact on the coastal economy.
The above comments are my personal opinion and do not represent those of any organizations or agencies I may be a member of.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Get Bowed Up Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 April 2019 at 6:39pm
Chris I could only imagine the loss and sadly that's likely all it will be. 11.8mil no imagining that it's right there on paper. I wonder what the perception of the Rec industry is to the unknowing.



Edited by Get Bowed Up - 18 April 2019 at 6:41pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TomM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 April 2019 at 7:40pm
Saves money and Cbay is closer
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BaitWaster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 April 2019 at 10:35pm
Clearly drop in September was due to Hurricane Florence.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cnaff Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 April 2019 at 5:54am
Cbay seems to have its own crooked and messed up VA problems, too, unforch! I lament there seems to be a pestilence of legislative sphinctorial societies in control there and here. Clearly, BW has pointed out that Florence is driving the downturn in rec trips in NC. Obviously, we must focus on Florence if we are to achieve understanding, uh, scientifically?, uh, ethically?, uh, as stewards of a healthy estuary?, uh, BW, what were the ideals with which you base your stoic advice to us about how we must view the destruction of our own damned legacy? Maybe it's just that WE drive the threat to the estuarine fauna because we promote bad gear and smear it up and down through whatever damned water column and benthic nursery habitat and demand to prosecute this action even when everything but shrimp is flopping its seeming last gasp on the figurative North Carolina deck of depletion? Your whack a mole advice to us is really spot-on, because it's easy, with you on board, to see how insipid is our quest to noodle where the sportfishing economy, which is known to be full of us deplorable hicks who imagine the estuarine faunal and floral diminution, went?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote chriselk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 April 2019 at 9:01am
Originally posted by BaitWaster BaitWaster wrote:

Clearly drop in September was due to Hurricane Florence.

I think you mean clearly SOME or Most of the drop in September could be attributed to Hurricane Florence.  You don't mean all.  

Why?  If you look at the two preceding waves, May-June and July-August (prior to Florence), together they lost more than September-October and November-December, when compared to earlier years trips (absolute numbers).

We can speculate as to why folks are not fishing. If I might dare speculate, in October of most years, when speckled trout are in, the boat ramps in Carteret County are strewn with empty trailers.  Last year, a post-year freeze, there were relatively few large trout, and that might partially account for decline from that year.  The recreational speckled trout fishery is estimated to have an economic impact of 40-50 million dollars (pre MRIP).

Of interest, if you look at the July-August wave, it has been in decline for 4 years, relative to earlier years.  That wave has been the wave with the largest number of angler trips.


Edited by chriselk - 19 April 2019 at 4:45pm
The above comments are my personal opinion and do not represent those of any organizations or agencies I may be a member of.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 April 2019 at 9:21am

I have to agree with you Chris- the July-August wave is very troubling as that is peak tourist season.

The most interesting wave is the uptrend in the March/April period which has to be heavily driven by interest in the striped bass fishery.  

NC could be almost a year-round sportfishing destination...if properly managed. 


Edited by Rick - 19 April 2019 at 9:22am
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delete



Edited by bakesta - 19 April 2019 at 10:46am
"Do the right thing. It will gratify some people and astonish the rest." --- Mark Twain
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TomM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 April 2019 at 5:50pm
I do severely miss the fall fishing with Chuck at Harkers. Fourtunate where I live has good to great fishing almost all year

Edited by TomM - 19 April 2019 at 5:51pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chuck Laughridge Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 April 2019 at 9:09pm
Just as a note from my logbook, the weather in general, last year, screwed up more weekends and days during the week than any of the past five and it was followed by the year before that.  Unfortunately, the weather this year to date is starting the same.  Anecdotal, no doubt, but as accurate as logs can get.

The weather anomaly if the very short duration between fronts.  Seems like it used to be a hard blow, a day to settle out and maybe 2/3 days of good fishing weather.  Last few years it just seemed that front after front would cycle every 3/4 days.  If you lived here you got to fish, if you didn't, 3/4/5 weekends in a row of getting your ass kicked for sorry fishing gets mighty tough.  

Need to check El Nino/La Nina years.  But put that on top of NC's lack of many species accessible to small boats (under 25') and effort should be trending down.  

Last thing, we're coming up on 3 generations that have no idea what it was like in the 70/80s for gray trout, big blues at the OBX in both fall and spring, flounder plentiful enough to catch some for dinner.  Its a tough product to sell to an old guy like me who grew up on the pier and oft times had a grandmother cook what I caught for breakfast.  Can it get better, YES, but NC has to put a product out there that will be a draw from the largest economic drivers on the water ---- the recreational angler!

Good Fishing!!! 

   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kshivar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 April 2019 at 10:55am
And Chuck don’t forget the spot runs. As best I can recall it’s been 15+ years. Gone the way of the river herring. I doubt i’ll ever get to introduce my grandkids to that fall experience.
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and the HUGE CROAKERS by the thousands that use to exist.
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All dying as babies in shrimp trawls.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Get Bowed Up Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 April 2019 at 11:27am
Chuck your right on with the weather, if it wasn't for the clearer water last spring that allowed us to sight cast in the rain and clouds we wouldn't of had much of a cobia season. 2 weeks of rain in July didn't help anyone either.

I'd add inlet conditions along with others but there is no question regulations that make cost vs reward "not worth it" AND closed to harvest seasons have negative impacts. Marketable regulations trump in some state/s mentioned on this site.   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bakesta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 April 2019 at 3:08pm
I wonder if this has anything to do with the decline in fishing effort?

It's definitely another indicator of how bad our fish stocks have gotten in NC.

Or wait - will our resident denier/flat earther claim that this is a hurricane problem too?






And imagine what this graph will look like next March if we have a cold stun event that causes speckled trout to be closed.Shocked







Edited by bakesta - 20 April 2019 at 3:22pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cnaff Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 April 2019 at 4:40am
That graph, bakesta, is quite believable in its juxtaposition of states with evident healthy populations of varied estuarine species and tide runners, with NC s-u-c-k-I-n-g WORSE than hind t-I-t. If such graphic demonstrations can help the lubbers across the state who are in fact "lovers of the coast", understand the fact that we're the poster state for depletion, then we need more of this kind of visual representation to make it into media that those people see.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cnaff Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 April 2019 at 5:56am
Bowed, I have taken your posts as in some way being the work of some kind of fish, or fishing manager, and that you are intending for us to understand your thrust as being about the fish we love and have watched die off and or become available only to certain means of taking and gears which mostly us anglers don't use or want to use(fish example:s. flounder; gear example: gigs and gill nets). One bugaboo we find as recs on the way down and out as our fish are exterminated in the hitlerian sense, is that the regulations we face in terms of bag limits and access become talismans of our commitment to do whatever we can, in the Quixotic sense, to save our damned heritage and fend off this depletion for the sake our families' future stake in whatever can be maintained and allowed to thrive for them and us, moving forward. Your insistence that bag limits are central SOUNDS a lot like the carping point of the commercial lobby, which suggests that if the regulators were out of the way, the estuary would be hunky dory for those who would prosecute what's left as if it is all a healthy system. But it's not a healthy system, and you are carping to us about inconvenience, when we are lamenting, and wringing our hands, and struggling to come up with good, albeit unlikely solutions, given the current regime of 'pokes swingin' they scythe of rapture upon the corpse of the estuary. The problem is depleted stocks and obliterative prosecution of the biomass which leaves us in a situation of TOO FEW FISH to none at all, compared with years past where we could claim some pride in the state's resource and fishing. Cobia are a favorite of mine, and a rare treat to go chase them is fettish-like in its inspiration to me, yet, they seem damned vulnerable as their discrete finite populations move around, and up and down the coast(s), such that one might consider the covetous eyes we cast upon them to portend that our pursuit of them could, or will become, a sort of bum's rush, should we fall too far into the mindset that we want them opened up to increased harvest for us and the state's fish prosecutors, and also that the cobia is something of a rare species here in that there are some left to fuel a decent fishery. But we are concerned with the species that are bleepin' dead and gone, or decidedly on their way out, and your posts make you seem to be wanting protective regulations to be lessened, and you as well seem to tread lightly around the idea of conservation as if it's a cross to a vampire, and it IS JUST THAT to our commercial fishing lobby friends, who concur with you on AT LEAST the point they want unfettered access to any fish we USED TO CATCH, but now CAN'T, because they are gone, or on their way down the NC memory hole of fish species in decline or just gone( example:gray trout). Please forgive my charge here, but you are kind of like a BW lite to those who would conserve the fish, as you NEVER discernibly come off as a guy who would/will have anything like the motive to pursue conservation and instead, have somewhat solidified the idea that your true thoughts on this stuff are more oblique to conservation and would appeal to the bohunk in each of us to just let us at em. OK. We are still looking for the conservation Bowed who is not going along with the status quo, but you give us a Bowed who seems to want more fish from a diminished equation, while we tend to want, I think, a new equation with the beleaguered fishes restored and the marginal fishes enlivened, and you studiously avoid allowing us to believe you could possibly be an actual conservationist, especially in the NC sense where you must risk the ire of the let us at em crowd, whether rec or comm. Sorry if I seem a bit obstinate on this point, but at least it would be a good exercise for you if you want to set me straight or get in a little practice in addressing the disbelieving amongst us, but I do understand that if your constituency is purely coastal, then you probably should hang onto your guarded motivation because the conservation attitude sure hasn't won the day, ever, with our highly informed voters here along the coast. And BW just tells us where to stuff it, in the status quo sense, which is refreshing when compared to the uphill climb you put on us if we are perceive you as pro-conservation. Am I just an idiot, or is your campaign too complex for such as me to understand beyond what I've said above?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 April 2019 at 2:12pm


...looks like that Phil Shepard is the man for the commercial fish dealers-








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