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Limiting Consumer Access to Shrimp-The Real Story

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    Posted: 16 March 2017 at 6:10pm
NC shrimpers and Jerry Schill would have you believe that if the NC Wildlife Petition goes to rule making as written that it will severely limit the NC citizen's ability to obtain shrimp.

FAKE NEWS!

The real story is that NC shrimpers only land a small fraction of the shrimp consumed by NC's citizens from Manteo to Murphy.  The vast majority of all shrimp consumed in NC come from imports.  Without those imports, NC plates would be empty of shrimp!

So...

The fight against the Wildlife Petition isn't about protecting consumers, it's about protecting an industry that pays ZERO $$$$$ to harvest a public trust resource while using unsustainable otter trawls that are killing our estuaries due excessive bycatch and detrimental bottom disturbing gears.

Here's the industry's latest attempt to "make sure" the NC consumer has shrimp on their plate-

NOT!

From North Carolina fisheries Assoc. face book page:

North Carolina Fisheries Association, Inc.
2 hrs · James City, NC ·
JONES TESTIFIES ON BEHALF OF EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA SHRIMPERS
WASHINGTON, DC – Today at the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC), Congressman Walter B. Jones (NC-3) testified on behalf of Eastern North Carolina shrimpers in strong support of continuing anti-dumping duty orders against imported warmwater shrimp from Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam. The ITC first enacted these orders more than 10 years ago to offset cheating by foreign producers, and to help level the playing field for American shrimpers.
“Shrimping is an integral part of Eastern North Carolina’s heritage and economy,” said Congressman Jones. “Hard working Eastern North Carolina fishing families have been devastated by unfairly traded foreign shrimp. If these orders aren’t continued, I have no doubt that producers from communist China, Vietnam and elsewhere will start illegally dumping shrimp into our market again. That is unacceptable, and I hope the ITC will stand up for American workers.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yupas21PCAc

Background: In the early 2000s, the U.S. shrimp market nearly collapsed. Unfairly traded imports from Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam flooded the U.S. market at prices below the cost of production overseas. As a result, the American shrimp industry was forced to slash production and lay off workers. Many shrimpers abandoned the profession, sometimes after generations. The duty orders on dumped shrimp, first imposed in 2005, have helped bring stability to the market. Under international trade law, the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) is required to review existing anti-dumping orders every five years to determine if revocation would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of dumping, and as a result, material injury to American shrimpers. If the ITC does not come to that conclusion, the orders would be revoked. Today, the ITC held a public hearing on that review. The commission is expected to vote on the matter on May 2, 2017.
For additional information, please contact Allison Tucker in Congressman Walter Jones’ office at Allison.Tucker@mail.house.gov or (202) 225-3415.

Testimony at Frozen Warmwater Shrimp ITC Case
On the morning of March 16, I testified on behalf of Eastern North Carolina shrimpers, in strong support of continuing the orders against warm water shrimp f...
YOUTUBE.COM
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Edited by Rick - 18 March 2017 at 11:01am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BaitWaster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 March 2017 at 9:51pm
Originally posted by Rick Rick wrote:

NC shrimpers and Jerry Schill would have you believe that if the NC Wildlife Petition goes to rule making as written that it will severely limit the NC citizen's ability to obtain shrimp.

FAKE NEWS!

The real story is that NC shrimpers only land a small fraction of the shrimp consumed by NC's citizens from Manteo to Murphy.  The vast majority of all shrimp consumed in NC come from imports.  Without those imports, NC plates would be empty of shrimp!

So...

The fight against the Wildlife Petition isn't about protecting consumers, it's about protecting an industry that pays ZERO $$$$$ to harvest a public trust resource while using unsustainable otter trawls that are killing our estuaries due excessive bycatch and detrimental bottom disturbing gears.

The issue isn't about availability of shrimp in general but protecting the availability of local-caught shrimp for those that prefer local-sourced seafood. Seems to be a growing demand for local sourced food at least in the Triangle and a selling point for some restaurants.

And paying ZERO $$$$$ (your underline and caps) isn't correct.  Shrimpers are required to have a SCFL/RSCFL, a commercial fishing vessel registration and, if they sell to the public, a fish dealers license.

Certainly the direct cost is low when compared to other extraction of public resources, e.g., timber on public lands, but more than zero. And the state does benefit in additional income and sales tax revenue.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cnaff Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2017 at 9:13am
Dwindling stocks cause dwindling visitation and resident angling, which is a fully traditional use of this resource. The employ of steel draggers in the estuary is a more recent tactic to take biomass from the sounds. The takings of untargeted species produces a vast diminution of productivity, which many, many of us see in first person, actually, as "boots on deck", observers. As great of a raconteur as you might be, BW, and as affable as you are drinking on the beach, you produce a dim nitwit's version of what's happening in our nursery to the general fish population, and thus it's utility to us as consumers, anglers and commercial fisherman. Your insistent push of pseudo sophisticated pap in extolling the great benefits of the fish house hegemony would have been as on spot as if you had been in Libya, explaining to Muamar that he was only about to receive a therapeutic enema, albeit, delivered with a steel vessel.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BaitWaster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2017 at 10:00am
The post, see the first one by Rick, was about the availability of shrimp.  I simply suggested Schill's selling point was the availability of local-caught shrimp as the market is saturated with imported shrimp.  Never said I was a fan of the four-banger trawlers in the sound, but if you go from 5 days of trawling to 1 1/2 equivalent days (3 days, daylight only) one would expect less availability.

The price paid to harvest, while not a lot, is not zero.






Edited by BaitWaster - 18 March 2017 at 10:01am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2017 at 10:54am
Originally posted by BaitWaster BaitWaster wrote:

And paying ZERO $$$$$ (your underline and caps) isn't correct.  Shrimpers are required to have a SCFL/RSCFL, a commercial fishing vessel registration and, if they sell to the public, a fish dealers license.

Certainly the direct cost is low when compared to other extraction of public resources, e.g., timber on public lands, but more than zero. And the state does benefit in additional income and sales tax revenue.


Originally posted by BaitWaster BaitWaster wrote:

The price paid to harvest, while not a lot, is not zero.


Is that your best shot at trying to discredit my post?  Quibbling!  No surprise, I actually wouldn't expect anything of more substance.

I will note that you were accurate in saying the "direct cost is low".  Yes, as in minimal and doesn't cover the management costs for Division staff and law enforcement related to those licenses.  So therefore how does the citizen of NC reap any "return" on the harvest of those public trust resources.

These 2016 statistics might interest a few-

Total SCFL and retired SCFL sold = 6465 with the number of retired licenses sold at 1/2 price being 1323.

The number of retired licenses sold annually have increased 55% over the last ten years, going from 853 in 2007 to 1323 in 2016.  A SCFL sells for $200 + a $200 fee paid for observing.  The RSCFL (all the same privileges as a SCFL except assignment) selling for $100 + $100 fee paid for observing.

Of the 6465 licenses sold in 2016 only 2636 reported any legal landings under the mandatory trip ticket program, 41%.

So, if you look at those reporting landings and assume a proportional share of retired licenses-
529 x $100 = $52,900
2107 x $200 = $421,400

Less than $500,000 was contributed to the operational budget of NCDMF for those actively fishing and legally selling our public trust resources.

"NOT A LOT"

What an understatement.

Commercials landed $95-million worth of dockside reported value in 2015.

If you'd like to continue with the quibbling, you might look at what the commercials have to pay in vessel fees and add that value to my number.

I've not included the observing fee because it goes into a "slush fund" for Jerry to spend if not used to cover the direct cost of observing under terms of the ITPs.

You obviously don't understand Supply and Demand.  If the NC consumer truly demands "fresh local wild-caught shrimp" then that demand will support a profitable enterprise for local shrimpers no matter how cheap import shrimp may be.



Edited by Rick - 18 March 2017 at 5:50pm
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I tend to view this in terms of the availability of fish for most everyone
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"but if you go from 5 days of trawling to 1 1/2 equivalent days (3 days, daylight only) one would expect less availability."

That math only works in eastern NC, and assumes that the shrimpers were working day and night.  If one boat goes from five 12 hour nights work to three 12 hour days work, how is that equivalent to 1 1/2?

And I didn't read Jones mentioning yuppies or niche markets in Raleigh, just downeast fishing communities, jobs heritage and economy.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BaitWaster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2017 at 4:52pm
Originally posted by Rick Rick wrote:


Is that your best shot at trying to discredit my post?  Quibbling!  No surprise, I actually wouldn't expect anything of more substance.

I will note that you were accurate in saying the "direct cost is low".  Yes, as in minimal and doesn't cover the management costs for Division staff and law enforcement related to those licenses.  So therefore how does the citizen of NC reap any "return" on the harvest of those public trust resources.

These 2016 statistics might interest a few-

Total SCFL and retired SCFL sold = 6465 with the number of retired licenses sold at 1/2 price being 1323.

The number of retired licenses sold annually have increased 55% over the last ten years, going from 853 in 2007 to 1323 in 2016.  A SCFL sells for $200 + a $200 fee paid for observing.  The RSFL (all the same privileges as a SCFL except assignment) selling for $100 + $100 fee paid for observing.

Of the 6465 licenses sold in 2016 only 2636 reported any legal landings under the mandatory trip ticket program, 41%.

So, if you look at those reporting landings and assume a proportional share of retired licenses-
529 x $100 = $52,900
2107 x $200 = $421,400

Less than $500,000 was contributed to the operational budget of NCDMF for those actively fishing and legally selling our public trust resources.

"NOT A LOT"

What an understatement.

Commercials landed $95-million worth of dockside reported value in 2015.

If you'd like to continue with the quibbling, you might look at what the commercials have to pay in vessel fees and add that value to my number.

I've not included the observing fee because it goes into a "slush fund" for Jerry to spend if not used to cover the direct cost of observing under terms of the ITPs.

You obviously don't understand Supply and Demand.  If the NC consumer truly demands "fresh local wild-caught shrimp" then that demand will support a profitable enterprise for local shrimpers no matter how cheap import shrimp may be.

So I post my opinion and make a correction to your post and I'm discrediting and quibbling. 

"Lighten up, Francis"  Big smile

No clue as to how money from SCFL's and other licenses not used doesn't contribute to management of the users. 

BTW, in 2016 there were 28,688 commercial licenses and permits issue per NCDMF's Summary Statistics

Only thing I could find as to % of operating NDM operating budget was from 2008 and Commercials provided 10% and recreationals 18%.  (64% appropriations, 7% federal grants). FYI in 2005 WRC got 26% of income from licenses and  13% from vessel registration.
Originally posted by Glacierbaze Glacierbaze wrote:

"but if you go from 5 days of trawling to 1 1/2 equivalent days (3 days, daylight only) one would expect less availability."

That math only works in eastern NC, and assumes that the shrimpers were working day and night.  If one boat goes from five 12 hour nights work to three 12 hour days work, how is that equivalent to 1 1/2?

And I didn't read Jones mentioning yuppies or niche markets in Raleigh, just downeast fishing communities, jobs heritage and economy.

Currently there are no hour limits to restrict trawling so theoretically boats can trawl from Sunday PM to Friday PM. Certainly a stretch saying 1 1/2 days but think pink & brown shrimp are more active at night and whites (greentails) more active during day so that is in the mix.

I was speculating Schill's selling points not Jones and I suspect folks like Locals Seafood in Raleigh are also lobbying on Jones St.


Edited by BaitWaster - 18 March 2017 at 4:58pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bakesta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2017 at 5:40pm
Originally posted by BaitWaster BaitWaster wrote:

 
The issue isn't about availability of shrimp in general but protecting the availability of local-caught shrimp for those that prefer local-sourced seafood. 



That is just absolute horsesh!t!!!


You keep saying it and trying to sell it but if you really believe it, you are an absolute moron.


And if you know it's not true, then you are either  just a commercial groupie or another schill - not sure which is worse.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Redfish Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2017 at 5:44pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BaitWaster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2017 at 6:15pm
Originally posted by bakesta bakesta wrote:

That is just absolute horsesh!t!!!
You keep saying it and trying to sell it but if you really believe it, you are an absolute moron.
And if you know it's not true, then you are either  just a commercial groupie or another schill - not sure which is worse.

It's    not   about   the   availability   of   shrimp    to    NC    consumers     as    the    vast     majority     of     shrimp    consumed    in     NC     are     imported. 

Ray,     Rick,    and    others    have    stated     this    on     multiple     occasions   and   there    is     no argument    from    a    reasonable    person.    Shrimp     will     be    available

To     reduce     bycatch,     the     Petition     proposes     reducing     effort    and    by    extension     the     amount     of     NC     local    shrimp    harvested.      Less    shrimp    equals     less     bycatch    (I prefer    dead     discards)

This     will    reduce     the    availability    of     local-caught     shrimp.   And    income    to     the    shrimpers    from    the     sale    of    shrimp.  

If     you    can't    understand     this,    then    it    is    not    I     that     is     the     moron.  

Read it s l o w l y. 

It's not that hard a concept to grasp certainly from someone with your educational background Dr. bakesta.  Less local shrimp,  less dead discards, all other factors being equal. 


Edited by BaitWaster - 18 March 2017 at 6:19pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bakesta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2017 at 6:25pm
Originally posted by BaitWaster BaitWaster wrote:

This     will    reduce     the    availability    of     local-caught     shrimp.

EVERY other state has stopped trawling in their nursery areas and they have no shortage of fresh local shrimp.

SC stopped it and their fresh local shrimp harvest went up.


You are pushing a lie.   Plain and simple.   


Read that as fast as you can - over and over.



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ray Brown Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2017 at 6:49pm
Bernie... The petition, and I repeat, is designed to change where and when shrimp are caught in NC in order to reduce mortality of juvenile fin fish. It does not put a limit on shrimo harvest and since shrimping is not done 24/7 now or even 24/5 by any single entity the probability of actual shrimping time may or may not be reduced overall. No doubt the percent of available time being used will go up, but any claim beyond that is supposition.

That claim is nearly as erroneous as the one being perpetuated that if all state waters are made special secondary nurseries that it would restrict waterside development or what one could do with their waterside property; which is an absolute falsehood, but one being sold to many as a scare tactic. A lot of people and some politicians are no longer going to let "commercial fishing rights" be enabled and perpetuated by lies.

And any state, county, or city official who attempts to perpetuate such false information is going to be publicly rebuked up to and through their losing their job if necessary. No threat, a fact to be considered by all it may involve.

Edited by Ray Brown - 18 March 2017 at 6:54pm
Some trawl operator will be forced to change in order to reduce bycatch. If you worry about that more than stopping the bycatch then the resource is secondary to you. Recovery has one less advocate.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BaitWaster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2017 at 9:10pm
So, Rick, Ray, bakestra, given the changes in shrimping days, times and headrope as proposed in the petition, what would a reasonable person think is the anticipated effect on shrimp harvest in NC?


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Glacierbaze Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2017 at 9:23pm
You didn't ask me, but i would anticipate equal or greater pounds of shrimp caught in the ocean, at a larger size, and bringing a better price, than smalls caught in the sounds.
Isn't that what happened in SC?
But, even if shrimp harvest goes down, and we see documented results of some recovery in fin fish stocks, I would take that result, too.


Edited by Glacierbaze - 18 March 2017 at 9:26pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ray Brown Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2017 at 10:01pm
Glacier has it about right on shrimp, but let's not forget better flounder, spot, croaker, and weakfish fishing for all.

NC never mentions it, but in the Gulf states they admit that shrimp trawls scoop up a lot of flounder. Baitwaster 2 might elaborate from experience.

Edited by Ray Brown - 18 March 2017 at 10:02pm
Some trawl operator will be forced to change in order to reduce bycatch. If you worry about that more than stopping the bycatch then the resource is secondary to you. Recovery has one less advocate.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BaitWaster Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 March 2017 at 10:58am
So I'm guessing y'all think the fiscal note associated with the Petition will show no financial impact.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ray Brown Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 March 2017 at 11:34am
You want my honest opinion? If so, it all depends on who does it. If you get an economist from one of the best business schools in the state to do it that coldly evaluates all aspects of economic gains and losses for both industries and the state as a whole then history shows you will get a different answer than if a member of an organization long ago the victim of regulatory capture does it.


To specifically answer your question, the answer is it will have financial impact, but if measured correctly there will be gains and losses, but the measurement must not be on the shrimp industry alone. The state doesn't do one sided economic studies when they build roads or issue operating permits to utilities or private firms so there will be much said if in this case the whole focus is on shrimping itself.

A five percent increase in recreational fishing expenditure, should fin fish abundance occur, would have an economic gain of thirty million dollars to the state. That alone is more than the entire shrimp industry in NC. The only multiplier for local shrimp is packing. Imported shrimp prepared for the table in NC have all the other multiplyers so they would not be lost on regulatory change.

Domestic harvest of shrimp, with no regulatory limits, varies as much as 30% from year to year, but consumption remains constant or goes up in NC each year so history clearly shows that imports have quickly and consistently filled those yearly swings.

And that proves one big point. Imported shrimp had always filled the void of poor foraging years thus a viable and sustainable substitute to the citizens exist.

There has been no substitute and the void waters grow broader when chasing spot, croaker, and grey trout in our sounds. The loss here, has no substitute, and the economic experience to the state is at an all time low.

Edited by Ray Brown - 19 March 2017 at 11:46am
Some trawl operator will be forced to change in order to reduce bycatch. If you worry about that more than stopping the bycatch then the resource is secondary to you. Recovery has one less advocate.
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"The only multiplier for local shrimp is packing. Imported shrimp prepared for the table in NC have all the other multiplyers so they would not be lost on regulatory change."

I am not real sure I understand this..Could someone please elaborate on what are multipliers for local shrimp?

Thank you
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ray Brown Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 March 2017 at 2:45pm
Sure...A multiple is what other economic transaction is enacted as a shrimp moves from the water to a person's stomach.

Harvesting shrimp and selling it to a fish house or dealer is the first multiple. Selling directly from harvester to consumer without a dealer is illegal in NC.

Packing would be next and last in terms of advantage to NC between domestic and imported shrimp. The cost of boats, gear, fuel, etc. is not a multiplier because they add no value in the chain of use and have to be paid for within the profit derived from the dockside value of the shrimp or else we have a harvesting business operating at a loss.

Wholesaling, cleaning, retailing, cooking, and carrying it to a table are also multipliers, but they are active multiples no matter whether the shrimp are domestic or imported.

Pamlico Packing, as an example, sells both domestic and imported shrimp so for them there is no difference unless they pack local shrimp which is the single multiplier in NC that imported shrimp don't participate in.

Having said all that and then thinking it through, a multiplier effect is technically about new income into an economy and it's effect on that economy. The shrimping income in eastern NC is a known commodity and since there seems to be a biological limit on shrimp to be harvested there are no potential multiplyers from an industry that can not have production growth.

Aquaculture has no such limits nor does the act of recreational fishing because it is not directly tied to destroying an asset as is net based fishing, so in reality only increased imports of shrimp for consumption and an increase in recreational fishing because of enhanced abundance have possible future multipliers to be considered, there seems to be no growth potential in domestic shrimping in NC. We have always harvested with no statutory limit in place.


Edited by Ray Brown - 19 March 2017 at 5:43pm
Some trawl operator will be forced to change in order to reduce bycatch. If you worry about that more than stopping the bycatch then the resource is secondary to you. Recovery has one less advocate.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 March 2017 at 7:03pm
Bullseye!

I'd like to see the five top shrimp dealers release their sales information (accurate information) on instate versus out of state sales. Those multipliers die at the dealer on out of state sales with the exception of one more step if a local trucker is hauling those out of state sales.

Those big dealers sell import shimp instate. As Ray said, the multiplier effect continues and has zero to do with "fresh" local.

Edited by Rick - 19 March 2017 at 9:07pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CapRandy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2017 at 1:02am
That is just absolute horsesh!t!!! Exactly !


Murder is killing but all killing is not murder
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Quickfix Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2017 at 10:34am
"so in reality only increased imports of shrimp for consumption and an increase in recreational fishing because of enhanced abundance have possible future multipliers to be considered, there seems to be no growth potential in domestic shrimping in NC. "

Actually, according to this explanation of multipliers, there is great potential for growth in the multiplier effects of domestic shrimping in NC. Quite simply all local shrimp that does end up in the stomachs of NC consumers enjoys these multipliers so it would only stand to reason that more local shrimp staying local would have increased multiplier effects.

I believe there is great demand in NC for this so the growth potential is great. Many would be surprised at just how much does stay local. Perhaps outreach and education will catch up and more and more shrimp will stay in state. I do know that in state sales are growing rapidly, much faster than I realized.

Thanks
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TomM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2017 at 10:45am
Quickfix show me the numbers to back that up.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Glacierbaze Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2017 at 11:03am
X2, surprise us!
"You can never elevate your own character by stepping on someone else's."

"Never argue with a man who loves the sound of his own voice."
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Quickfix Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2017 at 4:11pm
https://ncseagrant.ncsu.edu/ncseagrant_docs/coastallaw/LT/lt_autumn_2014.pdf

https://ncseagrant.ncsu.edu/ncseagrant_docs/products/2010s/fishhouse_inventory_2012.pdf

https://ncseagrant.ncsu.edu/coastwatch/previous-issues/2011-2/winter-2011/local-catch-and-the-survey-says-local-seafood-reigns/

https://www.cefs.ncsu.edu/ncgt/analysis-of-nc-seafood-industry-national-and-state-perspective.pdf

Very informative reading. I find it very interesting that the potential growth in multiplier effects are not only tied to the increased demand to purchase and consume local but also to the type of product as well.

ie the consumer is wanting and willing to pay more for what they deem as responsibly and sustainably harvested products whether it be protiens or vegetables.

Outreach and education are the things that can drive consumer trends and also drive the adaptations necessary for the producers to adopt in order to stay viable.

thanks

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2017 at 5:05pm
Originally posted by Quickfix Quickfix wrote:

the consumer is wanting and willing to pay more for what they deem as responsibly and sustainably harvested products whether it be protiens or vegetables.  Outreach and education are the things that can drive consumer trends and also drive the adaptations necessary for the producers to adopt in order to stay viable. thanks 


So, please explain to me how otter trawl caught shrimp with about 58% of all NC landings coming from the Pamlico Sound fits into "responsibly and sustainably harvested products"?

The video below shows otter trawling in the Pamlico Sound on the FV Birdie P owned by the Potter family of Hobucken/Lowland, NC, also owners of R.E. Mayo Seafood.  This video was taken by the captain of the Birdie P and you hear in the audio no evidence of concern over this level of extreme bycatch.  In fact, you can hear the crew proudly state-  "There's shrimp there!" 

Again, how is this responsibly and sustainable harvested product?  This bycatch consists of juvenile croaker, spot, weakfish, flounder and blue crab.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLl4GSZLqGU




Edited by Rick - 20 March 2017 at 5:34pm
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NC Fisheries Management- Motto: Too Little, Too Late, Too Bad   Slogan: Shrimp On! Mission Statement: Enable Commercial Fishing At Any and All Cost, Regardless of Impact to the Resource.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Redfisher Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2017 at 8:25am

Hoist that video up at your local Whole Foods and see what happens.
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